Home > Sentence > the Battle of Evesham

1 After the baronial victory at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, Simon de Montfort took control of royal government, but at the Battle of Evesham the next year Montfort was killed, and King Henry III restored to power.

2 On 4 August 1265, Montfort faced an army led by Prince Edward (later King Edward I) and the powerful Earl of Gloucester, who had recently defected to the royalist side, at the Battle of Evesham.

3 Released in early 1265, Edward then defeated Montfort at the Battle of Evesham;

4 On 29 August 1265 the Cardinal was received at the French Court by King Louis IX. There he learned that Simon de Montfort and his son Henry had been killed at the Battle of Evesham earlier that month.

5 Historian Oscar de Ville discusses the career of John Deyville and his brother Robert, along with their kinsmen Jocelin and Adam, during the Second Barons' War, specifically their activities after the Battle of Evesham.

6 Henry won a significant victory at the Battle of Evesham in 1265, allowing him to regain control of the country and the Tower of London.

7 On 4 August 1265, Simon de Montfort was killed in the Battle of Evesham in Worcestershire.

8 After the Battle of Lewes, Edward was hostage to the rebellious barons, but escaped after a few months and defeated the baronial leader Simon de Montfort at the Battle of Evesham in 1265.

9 The two forces then met at the second great encounter of the Barons' War, the Battle of Evesham, on 4 August 1265.

10 Henry's eldest son, Edward, escaped from captivity to defeat de Montfort at the Battle of Evesham the following year and freed his father.

11 Simon, accompanied by the captive Henry, was unable to retreat and the Battle of Evesham ensued.

12 Henry quickly took revenge on his enemies after the Battle of Evesham.

13 De Montfort was to die at the Battle of Evesham in 1265, a battle in which Llywelyn took no part.

14 This put Montfort in a position of ultimate power, which would last until Prince Edward's escape, and Montfort's subsequent defeat at the Battle of Evesham in August 1265.

15 Prince Edward Gilbert de Clare The Battle of Evesham (4 August 1265) was one of the two main battles of 13th century England's Second Barons' War.

16 In regard to wide-scale confrontations, the Battle of Evesham and its aftermath proved decisive: it ended baronial opposition in the reign of Henry III.

17 After the final defeat of the rebels at the Battle of Evesham in 1265, William continued to serve Henry III, and then Edward I, until his death in 1296.

18 He also held the office of chancellor to Edward from the time of the Battle of Evesham in 1265 until 1270, when Edward left on crusade.

19 and The Battle of Evesham (or Hexham), of which the manuscript, traced to the beginning of the 18th century, is lost.

20 Red crosses seem to have been used as a distinguishing mark worn by English soldiers from the reign of Edward I (1270s), or perhaps slightly earlier, in the Battle of Evesham of 1265, using a red cross on their uniforms to distinguish themselves from the white crosses used by the rebel barons at the Battle of Lewes a year earlier.